https://despatch.blog.gov.uk/2017/07/06/making-the-driving-test-more-reflective-of-real-life-driving/

Driving test changes: making the test more reflective of real-life driving

A learner driver on a lesson

Back in April 2017, we announced that the driving test will change from 4 December 2017. The changes include:

  • increasing the independent drive to 20 minutes
  • following directions from a sat nav
  • revising the manoeuvres
  • answering a vehicle safety question while driving

The changes will make sure new drivers have the skills they need to help them through a lifetime of safe driving. They’re supported by driver training and road safety representatives who helped us to develop and trial them.

Any test taken on or after 4 December will be the new test. So, we want to make sure you have the information you need to prepare your pupils and help them stay safe on Britain’s roads.

Real-life manoeuvres

We’re revising the manoeuvres so they better reflect real-life scenarios and how people drive today.

It’s vital your pupils know when it’s safe to carry out these manoeuvres, and when it isn’t.

Pulling up on the right

This manoeuvre involves pulling up on the right-hand side of the road, reversing for approximately 2 car lengths and then re-joining the traffic.

While The Highway Code advises not to park against the flow of traffic, it’s a legal manoeuvre that’s carried out by a lot of drivers on today’s roads. You might use it when pulling over to nip into a shop, post a letter, deliver a parcel or even if you live on the right-hand side of the road. So, it’s important learner drivers are trained to do it safely.

All your pupils will need to be prepared to pull up on the right when safe to do so, and then reverse. If a vehicle pulls in front then the exercise will continue.

If a vehicle pulls in behind and stops your pupil from reversing, then the exercise will stop and another manoeuvre will be carried out later in the test.

Forward parking in a bay

An essential part of everyday driving for most people is the ability to park safely.

We know that sometimes it can be more convenient to drive forward into a parking bay, such as in a supermarket car park when loading shopping, which is why we’re adding this to the test.

We understand you’ll need to use a car park to let your pupils practise this manoeuvre. We know you’ll be considerate of the car park owners and their customers by varying the car parks you use and moving on promptly.

Managing real distractions

Research shows that 52% of car drivers now have a sat nav so it’s important that drivers can use them safely.

Using a sat nav on the test means that examiners will be able to better assess how pupils drive independently whilst dealing with distractions.

Before the test starts, the examiner will secure the sat nav on the car dashboard using a special dash mat.

During the test, your pupil won’t need to touch the sat nav.

The sat nav screen will be on throughout the test but won’t show directions until the independent driving part of the test, when the examiner will activate the pre-loaded section of the route. The sound will be used for the independent driving part of the test unless your pupil asks for it to be turned off.

The sat nav we’re using

We’ll be using a TomTom Start 52 for the test, but I’d like to stress that it doesn’t matter what sat nav you use for lessons.

Our examiners won’t be looking at whether your pupil can set up and use a sat nav. They’ll be assessing how they manage the distraction while driving.

Your pupils can practise with any sat nav, including using a mobile phone as a sat nav. As long as the phone is suitably mounted and your pupil doesn’t adjust the phone whilst driving, it’s not illegal.

As we’ll be using our own sat navs with stored test routes, it would help your pupil’s test run more smoothly if you remove your sat nav before their test. Leaving your sat nav in the car could create an additional distraction for your pupil or make it more difficult to set up the examiner’s sat nav.

Following road signs

Your pupils may still be asked to follow road signs during the independent drive rather than use a sat nav. It’s important your pupils are taught both methods of navigation as 1 in 5 tests will still follow road signs.

‘Show me, tell me’ questions

We’ve updated the ‘show me, tell me’ questions that your pupils will need to prepare for from 4 December.

The main difference will be that one of the show me questions will be asked while your pupil is driving. But, the main topics have stayed the same.

Changing the routes - improving road safety

We’re committed to reducing the number of young drivers who are killed and seriously injured in road collisions. Most fatal collisions happen on high-speed or rural roads, so we want to make sure that everyone can use these roads safely.

Revising the manoeuvres will allow more of these high-risk roads to be included in driving test routes, as they won’t all need to be carried out on quieter side streets.

Using a sat nav on the test will also help to introduce better routes and different types of roads. Currently we’re restricted to carrying out the independent drive on roads where there are suitable road signs. This is often in urban and built up areas.

Using a sat nav means we’ll be able to conduct more of the test in more challenging driving environments such as on rural roads where there are fewer traffic signs.

How we’re assessing deaf drivers

We want everyone who's able to drive safely to be able to take and pass their driving test.

We worked closely with the British Deaf Association and showed them a demonstration of the new test when we were trialling the changes.

Their feedback was positive and they agreed to introduce a sat nav to the test made it easier for deaf drivers to have directions communicated to them, as they’ll get a visual aid.

There’s a good write-up on the British Deaf News website with more information about the impact the changes will have on deaf drivers.

Get in touch

We’re excited about introducing these changes to the test so that a new generation of drivers will have the skills and knowledge to help them through a lifetime of safe driving.

If you have any further questions about the changes, please ask them in the comments below. We want to make sure you have the information you need before the changes take effect on 4 December.

Make sure you’re signed up for email alerts or follow us on Twitter and Facebook for the latest updates.

156 comments

  1. Comment by Tony Mihill posted on

    Including Sat Navs on a test is a poor decision and not like real life driving as most people only use Sat Navs when going somewhere they don't know. Most peoples driving is around town, to work/school and to visit places or people they know therefore in a place they have been before. No need for a Sat Nav. I am aware that a lot of ADi's have expressed this to the DVSA team that developed this but weer given excuses like "my daughter uses a Sat Nav around town all the time". Please do not let this decision be based on what 1 examiners daughter does. Changes needed to be made and most of them I applaud but not this one.

    • Replies to Tony Mihill>

      Comment by Dave w posted on

      Sat nav bad idea more of a distraction than help

  2. Comment by Julie posted on

    What about motorway driving, that should be included.

    • Replies to Julie>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      My colleague John answered another question on the blog about allowing learner drivers on motorways. You can find it here: https://despatch.blog.gov.uk/2017/07/06/making-the-driving-test-more-reflective-of-real-life-driving/#comment-2472

      Thanks,

      Chris

      • Replies to Chris (DVSA)>

        Comment by Sam posted on

        I'm hard of hearing and your asking me to follow a sat nav yet alone answer questions while driving surely enough you only took the people who can hear and say that test will be fine yet you probley not tested it on a deaf or hard of hearing person

        • Replies to Sam>

          Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

          Hello,

          We worked with the British Deaf Association and showed them a demonstration of the new test when were trialling it. Their feedback was very position and agreed that introducing a sat nav made it easier for deaf drivers.

          There’s link in the blog to a good write-up on the British Deaf News website with more information about the impact the changes will have on deaf drivers.

          Thanks,

          Chris

  3. Comment by Paul Gill posted on

    All for the better. I still feel that a sign such as an ear crossed out on a number plate to indicate driver is deaf would be a good idea. Unmarked police cars without rooftop strobes a deaf driver can't see or hear. It would also let the other drivers know why you may not react to emergency sirens. As a deaf person a policeman in an unmarked car opens his window and shouted abuse to me at the Dartford crossing as I could not see his grille lights and unable to Hear his siren. Plus no learners I have spoken to have. Ever been taught how to react to a blue light

  4. Comment by Roger Kingstone posted on

    I feel there will be carnage when there is a significant hard frost or fall of snow as most drivers today have had no experience of really slippery road conditions. I would like to get my two teenage granddaughters (1 of 19, who has passed her test, the other 17 and just started driving lessons) for a session on a skid surface if this is possible?

  5. Comment by Richard Barnes posted on

    Absolute nonsense by the DVLA again. Introduce a dubious manoeuvre and still leave emergency stops for only 30%of tests.... true reflection

  6. Comment by Jason mcfarlane Dvsa adi posted on

    Will the speed be displayed on the sat nav on test?

    • Replies to Jason mcfarlane Dvsa adi>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      The candidate should use the car's speedometer as that is the only speed that will be used during the test.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  7. Comment by Glyn Marriott posted on

    During the new driving test manoeuvre to pull up on the right, you have mentioned that if a car pulls up in front then continue with the manoeuvre and if a car pulls up behind abandon the manoeuvre. What happens when this happens on test and the candidate cannot see sufficiently to move away safely ie car in front and car behind? Is the examiner then able to advise a candidate when it would be safe to move away from the right hand side of the road due to lack of vision ahead?

    • Replies to Glyn Marriott>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      The examiner will give the necessary guidance to assist the candidate when pulling away if their view is restricted by vehicles pulling close in front or behind during the time it takes to complete the manoeuvre.

      If a vehicle pulls in behind after the manoeuvre is completed, the candidate would be expected to make the necessary observational checks before moving off. They could benefit from moving forward to get a better view before moving back across to the left.

      Thanks,

      Chris

    • Replies to Glyn Marriott>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      Sorry for the delay in my reply.

      With the pull up on the right, the candidate will be asked to pull up on the right when it is safe rather than at a safe place. This is a manoeuvre rather than a normal stop exercise and the location that is chosen by the examiner will allow ample opportunity for the candidate to select when they think it is safe to move across to the right.

      If it becomes apparent that the opportunity to pull up somewhere suitable no longer exists, for whatever reason, then the examiner will control this situation with the possibility of aborting the exercise and choosing another location later in the test.

      If a vehicle pulls in behind after the manoeuvre is completed, the candidate would be expected to make the necessary observational checks before moving off. They could benefit from moving forward to get a better view before moving back across to the left.

      The examiner will give the necessary guidance to assist the candidate when pulling away if a vehicle pulls in extremely close - either in front or behind.

      I hope this answers your question.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  8. Comment by Stuart Taylor posted on

    I still find it laughable that you are holding to this more reflective of real life line. Are you going to be performing these manoeuvres where the real danger of them is tested? I doubt it. This then in fact makes them no more relevant that the current manoeuvres. The same instructors who currently train these things anyway will continue to train them and the ones that don't wil stop teaching turn in the road and reverse corner. If anything the new manoeuvres are easier that the former ones as a result of the conditions under which they will be performed. You also as yet have not answered the genuine issues raised about the car parks available and the problem of practicing the pull up on the right at night, as this is against the Highway Code and also in the winter when many learners will not be able to take lessons in the light.
    The getting to more dangerous roads statement is questionable at best especially at certain times of day and a lot of these roads around tested areas are sanitised any way by lowered speed limits, we all know that this could have been better achieved by increasing the length of the test or making post test training mandatory. Other areas that are already rural the test routes alredy cover these types of roads so there will be little change in these routes, as there are little available roads to change them too. The satnav element will be negated in no time by the fact that some instructors will track their vehicles, as they alredy do and find out exactly what routes you re using and teach them, not the ability to use a satnav correctly. If we are going down this route then why not test parking safely and with vehicle sympathy on the kerb?, this is not illegal other than in London. Parking at junctions? Taxi turns? Will the rules on mini roundabouts be relaxed on test to allow for the large percent of real life driviers that just drive straight over them? Or the same about the give away rule, which millions of occurrences a day happen where someone pulls out affecting the speed and direction of others greatly? Turnuing with out a signal where clearly there are others who would benefit? Attacking junctions aggressively and cutting corners or forcing other to yield in meeting situations? Failing to give way where safe to buses? Over taking right turners on the kerb? Tailgating? All of these happen in real life all day, every day, even though they are contrary to the Highway Code but not necessarily "illegal" are these going to be accepted on test? I have and always will fell that testing these new things will only validate poorer practices, not reduce the KSI stats as you purport but that real change will cost votes and cause issues for the government that can be postponed for 5 to 10 years whilst we wait for the proof that this change has worked or not, even though there is currently no proof that it will.

    • Replies to Stuart Taylor>

      Comment by Olivia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Stuart,

      We routinely review the content of the driving test. We want to ensure that it reflects real life driving so that new drivers are prepared as best as possible for driving on their own.

      We worked with the driver training industry and other interested bodies to identify these beneficial changes that reflect common driver behaviour.

      We're making the changes following a:

      - public consultation that over 3,900 people took part in
      - trial of the changes involving over 4,300 learner drivers and over 860 driving instructors

      The proposals were widely supported by those who responded to the consultation. The results of the consultation show that:

      - 88.2% agreed with increasing the length of the independent driving part of the test
      - 70.8% agreed with asking candidates to follow directions from a sat nav
      - 78.6% agreed with the plans to change how the reversing manoeuvres are tested
      - 78.4% agreed with asking the ‘show me’ question while the candidate is driving

      Just as there were lots of questions and concerns when we originally introduced the independent driving part of the test in 2010, we know there'll be questions and concerns about these changes.

      Our published response to the consultation addresses concerns that were raised by people who responded to the consultation. You can read that here: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/improving-the-car-driving-test

      Please do leave your questions here so we can get back to you with any information that you need to help you prepare for the changes.

      The elements of the test, including the increase of independent driving from 10 to 20 minutes, has been designed to transfer more responsibility to the candidate, making them better equipped to drive alone and think for themselves on the road.

      The current practical driving test spends a disproportionate time on low-risk roads, such as housing estates, largely to access locations to carry out manoeuvring exercises. The updated manoeuvres, whilse testing the same skill set, are more representative of what a new driver will encounter in their everyday driving.

      While conducting the test on a variety of different roads, the changes to the test will allow the examiner to access higher risk roads, where statistically new drivers have the most crashes.

      Using a sat nav during this section of the test will encourage a wider range of training, not only preparing new drivers to drive safely on rural roads, but also to manage distractions.

    • Replies to Stuart Taylor>

      Comment by Brian de Ville posted on

      Well said mate , i agree with every thing you have said, They keep pushing the Instructors . Not matter , what they do will make no difference at all . Its all about the drivers ATTITUDE

  9. Comment by Mr Stephen Poulter. posted on

    Good afternoon. Most of this is brilliant. But . the Police. And i do work for them. still treat things like cameras and sat navs as illegal in vehicles. Like self parking. So it would be best to make this legal before doing this new test. But if you want real life. Then go out and look at drivers. They are not just following routs on the sat nav. they are playing with it! Like with phones i see this every day! it fact. You can check this out. More accidents are now caused by sat navs than using mobile phones. As stated on numerous occasions by news channels from a lot of leading road users companies. So please look again before doing the test. I am a CPC holder. The old type. I used to trane my drivers. It took 20 mins. And after that had hardly any accidents at all. I also had a question for manufacturers that they looked on as crazy. But it dropped my insurance down to around £750 per year Fire and theft. Where as the courier company with the next lowest price was around £2500 per year. The question was this. What is the impact speed of the bumper before the headlights crack. If it was not 40 mph. Then i am not interested! And that is true. I do not take the 30 mph on a solid block as any good at all. I use actual crashes for information. I hope that you can check this info out.

  10. Comment by James Hinkins posted on

    One of the show me questions is raising concerns with some instructors.
    "When it's safe to do so, show me how you'd operate the horn"

    If the driver feels that it is not a suitable area, i.e. pedestrians that may be alarmed, is it acceptable to simply state that " I'd use it by pressing here but I don't wish to alarm anyone unnecessarily "

    • Replies to James Hinkins>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      The examiner will ask this question in a suitable location to allow for use of the horn to be demonstrated.

      I hope that answers your question?

      Thanks,

      Chris

  11. Comment by Morena Devine posted on

    The new test will not result in safer drivers on our roads .
    There was so much that could have been done and I, as an ADI , am extremely disappointed that this is what has been decided .
    We are now being asked to teach practice that is not the best practice , therefore , condoning it as good practice .the removal of the T.I.R is a mistake . Can't wait to see pupils going the wrong way with sat nav and examiners having to talk them through turning the car round as I can guarantee that not all instructor s will continue to teach this . Many teach purely to pass the test .
    I agree a lot of people will use sat nav but many won't .i also feel it will make them lazy drivers as it takes away the need to watch for and read signs and road markings .
    This may still be taught but more focus will be on the sat nav .
    I have too many objections that I won't even bother listing them all as it won't make a difference .
    It is a backward step in my opinion and it just makes me feel angry .
    I know I will need to get on with it and I will as I have no other choice .

  12. Comment by Trev Thomas posted on

    Yes I think most things have been covered would like to add when night driving how to alter the interior mirror to stop dazzle from behind?

  13. Comment by Angus McFadden posted on

    I try not to be anti-DVSA as a matter of course, but you really do shoot yourselves in the foot sometimes.

    A huge amount of money has been spent on "the trials", and it stands to reason that no one at DVSA is going to turn round as say it was all wasted, and it was better the way it was before.

    Using a satnav I can live with. Adding new manoeuvres that "reflect real life" I can also accept (though I wonder at what point during the latter part of the 20th Century this might have become true, and why it has taken until now to try and "reflect" it). But removing the turn in the road and corner reverse is just ridiculous - they are far more valuable than the new ones.

    Why couldn't ALL the manoeuvres be included in the syllabus? You're only going to test one of them anyway, so it's no skin off your noses. But it would make sure that they are taught.

    Up my neck of the woods, the first time bay parking was introduced to a test centre (none had done it previously) there was a mass boycott by instructors who didn't know how to teach it in favour of other centres. None of them had taught it before because they knew it wasn't going to happen on test, and pupils weren't happy paying for it to be taught if it wasn't going to help them pass. Quite frankly, a lot didn't KNOW how to teach it, and instead began telling pupils that the other centres were "easier" - a myth which persists to this day.

    And that is EXACTLY what will happen when you remove TIR and corner reverse. Some ADIs - and by no means all - will carry on teaching it. For while at least. Newly-qualified ADIs won't touch them after their first few scuffles with pupils and parents, and the threat of lost income. These skills will gradually disappear.

    If little Dwayne or Kylie misses the turn off for McDonalds at 11.30pm on a Friday night, I'd feel much safer myself if I thought they at least KNEW how to turn around safely, and their enhanced ability to park in McD's or fling the car across the opposite side of the road and stop outside the Co-op would not console me even a little.

    It's dumbing down, plain and simple.

  14. Comment by Vic Francis posted on

    Driving forward into a bay then reversing back does it matter if it's forward in and reverse straight back into an empty bay with all round observations or should it be reversing out part way then angling out to left or right as necessary not going into bay behind and full locking to right to move away. Also lee way for going over line slightly are they ok to correct if necessary before reversing out fully or doesn't it matter and teach whichever works best for a pupil as not sure what guidance examiners have. Wouldn't want a pupil to fail due to non approved test method

    • Replies to Vic Francis>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      The examiner will ask the candidate to choose either left or right reverse depending upon factors such as one-way traffic systems in car parks.

      Corrective shunts willl be allowed if required. It's about the candidate's control, accuracy, and observations.

      I hope this answers your question,

      Chris

  15. Comment by David Pinner posted on

    Will the emergency stop still be used on new test.

    • Replies to David Pinner>

      Comment by Olivia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi David,

      Yes, this could still be asked by the examiner during the test.

  16. Comment by carol ann Cardwell posted on

    I must admit having driven for 35years. 18years as a rep. Up and down the country using "my nose" and paper and road maps etc. And 15 years as an ADI. I have been a very reluctant participant in this NEW change?
    Feeling sat nav to be UNNECESSARY!! And an additional cost to my business as i have never needed or wanted one.
    However practicing with my pupils who will be long gone before the Dec deadline has been fun. They have embraced the task, enjoyed loading obscure destinations. And home destinations as well. They have indeed taught this dinosaur a thing or two. Bring it one and chillax.... as my yunguns say. :))

    • Replies to carol ann Cardwell>

      Comment by Carl posted on

      If you are following the national driver training standards you should
      Be doing sat navs anyway as it is in there ?

  17. Comment by Steven Cabrelli posted on

    I am concerned about how you refer to the changes as being 'reflective of how drivers drive today'. We/the DVSA are the standard bearers of how drivers should be taught and perform on the road within the parameters of the Highway Code. We teach our pupils to minimise risk yet you are including a high risk manoeuvre that has come about by allowing the public to dictate how things effectively should be done. By that logic everyone exceeds the speed limit on dual carriageways and the motorway should we then teach them how to do that? Of course not so why then involve a manoeuvre that could potentially create more problems on the road? Wouldn't the new test be best improved by involving more important things such as motorway driving?

  18. Comment by Peter posted on

    The answer to the tyre condition is wrong. Cuts are allowed, tread is measured on the centre of the tread not the tyre breath. Some tyres have a bulge at the seam.

  19. Comment by STEPHEN FLETCHER posted on

    Hello.
    Are the revised manoeuvres as well as or instead of the manoeuvres already carried out? ( are we finally getting rid of the turn in the road which causes so many delays to other road users) And will pupils still only have to perform one of the manoeuvres during the driving test.
    Kind regards

    Steve Fletcher

    • Replies to STEPHEN FLETCHER>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      Yes, the revised manoeuvres are instead of the old manoeuvres - pupils will no longer have to perform a turn in the road or reverse around a corner.

      They will still only have to perform one manoeuvre per test.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  20. Comment by Andrew Gill posted on

    Does the examiner guide the pupil out if a car pulls up behind them when parking on the road facing traffic and they are unable to reverse the 2 car lengths back?
    When you say the deaf society agree this is ok has now they have a visual aid to look at but this now takes there eyes off the road is this really safe? And dyslexic pupils struggle with the terms of the sat nav is this a plain turn left or turn right or does it give the details of all the road names etc and what distance will it give the directions ?

    • Replies to Andrew Gill>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      If the candidate has been prevented from reversing back, then the manoeuvre has not been completed, so the candidate will be asked to drive on and another exercise will be carried out later in the test.

      Introducing sat nav to the test allows for all candidates, including deaf, dyslexic etc to be trained in the appropriate and suitable use of such devices. This will better prepare them for when they drive independently after passing their test. Examiners are trained to make any necessary adaptions to ensure all candidates needs are taken into account.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  21. Comment by stephen pleasant posted on

    I have been an A.D.I for over 40yrs Car L.G.V. & P.C.V.
    I am giving up my licence this year due to this change of testing.
    Parking on the right & using sat nav's.!!
    Most people will not park on right as this is dangerous. Who would use a sat nav to go to the shops. The turning in the road is a manovour for control and observation this is required at all times during driving.
    The D.S.A. needs to get in the real world and not listen to people who have never done the job.
    Examiners have the easy job it is just "yes or know "

  22. Comment by Anna Galan posted on

    Will bay parking only consist of forward parking or will reversing into the bay also be required? Will parallell parking still be a part of the test?Thank you.

    • Replies to Anna Galan>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello Anna,

      Bay parking will be either driving forward into a bay and reversing out or reversing into a bay and driving out. For driving forward into a bay, we will only use car parks where there is no restriction for use. For reverse parking in a bay, we will only use test centre car parks.

      Parallel parking is still one of the three manoeuvres included in the test along with bay parking and pulling up on the right.

      I hope I've answered your questions.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  23. Comment by Ant posted on

    yes I have to agree it is a legal manoeuvre , pulling up on the right side of the road.
    However,,..,, with head lights still in use, ( wrong ) please put them on to side lights or off, and remember leaving a car at night against the flow is hazardous as rear reflectors will not be seen in correct lane.
    Further in addition to my disgust of this practice, if I need to nip to a shop I go around and come with the flow and park safely, persons are 99 percent more courteous when with the flow.
    and finaly we signed up to an agreement of lowering emissions, and holding two lanes of traffic up to complete that manoeuvre is hardly encouraging.
    And to teach learners bad habits is a shame on you.

  24. Comment by David Morley posted on

    It's disappointing that the candidate cannot refuse to use satnav on the test, as some people, like myself, do not trust satnavs and hence won't use them in real life. Surely they should have the option of being one of the 1 in 5? However, if they have no choice but to use DVSA's satnav on test, I believe the sound should always be on, with an option to have the screen off or turned away, (except for hard of hearing candidates). If the sound is off, the screen would be a severe distraction, possibly more of a distraction than glancing at a text! Beyond reasonable doubt the sound being off will compromise safe driving for life!

  25. Comment by Shivji Varsani posted on

    What about rule 239-Use off-street parking areas, or bays marked out with white lines on the road as parking places, wherever possible? If you have to stop on the roadside:

    do not park facing against the traffic flow

  26. Comment by A nother posted on

    Cat B driving test is far too easy and far too short, Might as well sit in an office and do it all on computer . DSA needs to look into the MOD cat B test passes I am not allowed to comment but most of the test pass drivers are dangerous and do not know the basics needed to avoid accidents.

  27. Comment by Nick ebans posted on

    With regard to the forward bay park exercise i have several concerns but primarily what if during the exercise the pupil hits another vehicle what action will the examiner take pkease dont say it wont happen as on more than one occasion my pupils have been allowed to hit a metal post outside the knaresborough test centre.
    Will they leave a note if so this is gping to seriously affect my insurance as a self employed instructor or as this will likely be carried out in a car park will they just drive away as cars are parked at the owners risk. Either way tbis is not a good situation
    Secondly how long do you think supermarket or similar car parks will put up with learners constantly been in their car parks when they are meant for shoppers so when they start putting no learner signs up what will you do then.
    I really dont think this has been thought through

    • Replies to Nick ebans>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      Driving examiners are trained to take control in these circumstances and will prevent any contact between vehicles. The safety of customers, the general public, and property is a high priority.

      In the highly unlikely event that this did occur, the examiner would deal with it in the most appropriate manner. Leaving a note may be a suitable option at that time.

      In answer to your second point - we're only going to use car parks with no restriction for use for forward parking in a bay during the test. For reverse parking in a bay, we will only use test centre car parks.

      We've also liaised with the British Parking Association (BPA) and other car park owners/operators and produced a guidance poster for all driving test centre waiting rooms. This will help you choose car parks to train your pupils in.

      Thanks,

      Chris

      • Replies to Chris (DVSA)>

        Comment by n evans posted on

        Whilst i appreciate your reply if the examiner is trained as you say why is it then on a large number of occassions candidates have been allowed to hit metal posts at the knaresborough test centre causing damage to my own car on 2 occassions? and allowed to clip wing mirrors and kerbs at speed. I cannot therefore trust what you say as again you are not dealing with real life situations but sitting in an office

  28. Comment by David Leonard posted on

    When pupils are taking lessons and the driving tests they will conform to their instructors and examiners way of driving its when they are out on there own or with friends they may compromise there own safety and other road users.

  29. Comment by Mark Camburn posted on

    Hi the only problem I can see is car parks. The council will not let driving school use local council car park. They are starting to fine driving schools.this can't be right. You DVSA want pupils to learn about car park. But local government is banning school.
    THIS NEED SORTING.

    • Replies to Mark Camburn>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      DVSA has liaised with the British Parking Association (BPA) and other car park owners/operators and produced a guidance poster for all driving test centre waiting rooms. This should help you choose car parks to train in.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  30. Comment by Rab Black posted on

    What an absolute load of tosh!!!!! These changes will make no difference to road safety, again it's another way to try and explain why examiners have a job that is totally unnecessary, what a farce

  31. Comment by Andrew Hebditch posted on

    Some of this makes no sense! At my local test centre Independent Driving is far from being done on quiet streets and in some cases includes joining a dual carriageway. Driving forwards into a bay could still be done at a test centre. Are you suggesting pulling up on the right on busy roads? Seems a wise suggestion. Most drivers I know at some stage use turn in the road or left reverse but these are being debunked. No logic. You could easily get someone to pull up on right then pull away and still include these. What exactly is the challenge of reversing in a straight line compared to what they are replacing. As for Sat Navs, the reasoning seems flawed. Surely it's not a case of how many people have them (probably closer to 100% if you included google maps on smart phones) but the question is how many journeys do people use them on? If it's just about distraction then have conversations in the car, play the radio etc. If safety is a concern make sure that rural routes are included on every test as well as, where geography allows, dual carriageways. If that means making the test longer then so be it.

  32. Comment by Andrew 1888 posted on

    How will the sat nav be powered. Will the examiners expect to use the 12 v power supply from cigarette lighter output? What if the car either doesn't have a 12 v charge point or it's being used to power perhaps auxiliary speedo.?

    • Replies to Andrew 1888>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      An external powerbank will be plugged into the sat nav itself for further power supply.
      Thanks,

      Chris

  33. Comment by Ian Grisby posted on

    So is the reverse around a corner, parallel parking and turn in road no longer required? Parallel parking is a real life manoeuvre surely?

    • Replies to Ian Grisby>

      Comment by John (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Ian

      The ‘reverse around a corner’ and ‘turn-in-the-road’ manoeuvres will no longer be tested, but should still be taught.

      Candidates will be asked to do one of 3 possible reversing manoeuvres:

      - parallel park at the side of the road
      - park in a bay - either driving in and reversing out, or reversing in and driving out (the examiner will tell you which you have to do)
      - pull up on the right-hand side of the road, reverse for 2 car lengths and rejoin the traffic

      You can find more information here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/driving-test-changes-4-december-2017

      • Replies to John (DVSA)>

        Comment by Angus McFadden posted on

        John, the ex-manoeuvres may well be bracketed under "SHOULD be taught" heading, but I can assure you that they won't be if there's no chance of them being tested for.

        Many instructors won't touch them from the outset, and many more will follow suit over the next couple of years.

        Many pupils (and their parents) won't want them taught if they're not being tested for because they believe it "costs them money". This will be especially true in the sorts of locations where driving attitudes are already poor. Instructors - and especially newer ones - are not going to risk losing work by arguing that with these parents.

        The only way of making sure they ARE taught is to have them on the syllabus, and potentially testable.

  34. Comment by Darrren posted on

    Why we feel it's a good idea to contradict the Highway Code and actively encourage new drivers to park into oncoming traffic I will never understand.

  35. Comment by R Bryant posted on

    Well It's official. 47% have disagreements with It. 27% say It's confusing and 52% say because of It they don't pay attention to road signs... God help us In December when they Introduce Sat Nav Into the driving test. And as regards to pulling onto the wrong side of the road... ridiculous. I've not found one instructor who agrees with it.Bay parking used to be an isolated excercise depending on your local test centre. If they had a car park, fine. Now you are going to get over 20,000 Driving instructors, not sure of the exact numbers I think it's more, looking for car parks. (if you look at ADI's by post code it says there are 39.000) My local test centre has had no notification what so ever where they are going to perform these excercises and if local councils oppose this then what. There are nearly 500 instructors registered in my post code area. Besides Tesco, Sainburys, Halfords and B&Q and you can't use these as they are too busy, there are about 2 quiet car parks.Yet again It's another, in my opinion, a hair brained idea. scheme

  36. Comment by Roger I Ward posted on

    pulling up on the right. i disagree with. for vans and lorries find. to reverse. not cars. it is illegal at night and should be during the day. as the driver is half way out into the main road before he or she can see if anything is coming . dangerous manouver. park only on the left. if you want to park on the right.plan your route. go round the block. find some where to to turn around to come back so you park on the left.

    not all sat navs are the same. some are better than others.

  37. Comment by Roger Outridge posted on

    As many driving instructors agree the parking on the right side of the road is potentially a dangerous manoeuvre. It is particularly more hazardous at night time when your headlights will be shining into the faces of oncoming traffic . To encourage a pupil to perform this manouvre is wrong . When you see a driver trying to pull away from the right hand side of the road and they are on their own in the vehicle they have to pull out a long way for them to see when it is clear .It is dangerous .Also the turn in the road should be maintained as it is probably one of the most common manoeuvres a driver performs .

  38. Comment by Alan White adi posted on

    What will happen if a pupil accidentally drives into a cul-de-sac on their test & has not been taught how to do either a turn in the road or reverse round the corner & therefore cannot get out? I think that these manoeuvres are more commonly used than pulling up on the right hand side of the road which I as a driver for over 40 years very rarely do as I consider it a dangerous manoeuvre

  39. Comment by Rob George posted on

    Will the Bay Parking still be carried out in the test centre car park or will it be in a public or private car park, e.g. Supermarkets? Having in mind most supermarkets now have number plate recognition cameras which then apply a fixed penalty if the vehicles returns during a certain period. The vehicle on test could have been practicing in the same car park prior to the test.
    Will the instructions for pulling up on the right be given when the vehicle is stationery or on the move (Or via the Sat Nav)?

    • Replies to Rob George>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      For forward parking in a bay, we will only use car parks where there is no restriction for use. For the reverse parking in a bay, we will only use test centre car parks.

      The instructions for pulling up on the right will be given while the candidate is driving.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  40. Comment by Richard posted on

    What will happen on show me tell me questions if the candidate has only one hand?

    • Replies to Richard>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      The examiner will make sure to ask an appropriate question. The instructor could approach the test centre prior to the test to explain how they have been dealing with this during training.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  41. Comment by Graham Tucker ADI cars posted on

    You will only improve driving standards by confronting post test driving. Constantly messing around with the test will not prevent people from passing through luck rather than ability.I have carried out my own survey amongst learners since the beginning of the year, and not one has felt sat navs on test will make any difference. The right reverse takes us back to when I first began, over 38 yrs when it seemed rather dangerous even then. Post test must be faced up to at some stage, but no that would be too upsetting for the wider driving public. Thankfully I am retiring soon, I do feel sorry though for those few Instructors who try to teach to drive and not just hope to pass a test. Yet as long as the DVSA continue just like the DSA, luck will determine who passes, with examiners trained to tick boxes.With no experience of teaching and unable to assess what really is a competent driver. I appreciate my comments will fall on deaf ears.

  42. Comment by Richard Bright posted on

    Not sure or convinced if there is a safe way to use a sat nav ? Just another distraction from watching what you should be looking at !! I was involved in a serious accident last Sunday when a driver turned right across my path!! Driver of the offending vehicle says sorry I was following the sat nav 3 people hospitalised 2 cars written off.

  43. Comment by Andrew Walker posted on

    I agree with the principles of updating the test. I am concerned about the car park aspect of training pupils, supermarkets, hotels, shopping centres etc are all private land whereby doing such training is not only an inconvenience to members of the public but is trespassing. There are going to be scores of instructors trying to find facilities to teach this manoeuvre and I think we will very soon see 'no driving tuition ' signage at car park entrances. I would appreciate your realistic suggestions.

    • Replies to Andrew Walker>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      We've liaised with the British Parking Association (BPA) and other car park owners/operators and produced a guidance poster for all driving test centre waiting rooms to help you train your pupils for bay parking.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  44. Comment by David Berry posted on

    After pulling up on the right, if someone pulls up behind, how does a driver move off safely?
    Where will the forward bay park be conducted?
    How exactly will the satnav be succured?

    • Replies to David Berry>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      If a vehicle pulls in behind after the manoeuvre is completed, the candidate would be expected to make the necessary observational checks before moving off. They may benefit from moving forward to get a better view before moving back across to the left.

      Forward bay parking will take place only in car parks where there is no restriction for use. Reverse bay parking will only take place in test centre car parks.

      The sat nav will be mounted in the centre of the dashboard if appropriate. Window mounting will be a secondary option.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  45. Comment by Grahan Tuffey ORDIT DVSA ADI posted on

    I have seen conflicting information that some of the traditional manoeuvres will be dropped from the new test. This blog does not explain which will go and which will stay. It makes sense that we still teach all manoeuvres but it would be useful if ADI' s could tell their students exactly what to expect.

    • Replies to Grahan Tuffey ORDIT DVSA ADI>

      Comment by John (DVSA) posted on

      Hi

      The ‘reverse around a corner’ and ‘turn-in-the-road’ manoeuvres will no longer be tested, but should still be taught.

      Candidates will be asked to do one of 3 possible reversing manoeuvres:

      - parallel park at the side of the road
      - park in a bay - either driving in and reversing out, or reversing in and driving out (the examiner will tell you which you have to do)
      - pull up on the right-hand side of the road, reverse for 2 car lengths and rejoin the traffic

      You can find more information here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/driving-test-changes-4-december-2017

      Thanks
      John

  46. Comment by Steve Pearce posted on

    Are you contacting the owners of the nearby car parks(with relation to the test centres) informing them that a driving instructor vehicle could be using the car park for test purposes? I have been asked on numerous occasions to 'move on and leave ' by employees of the car park owners. How would this affect the test of this was to happen?

    • Replies to Steve Pearce>

      Comment by John (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Steve

      We'll use a wide variety of car parks for the bay parking exercise, such hotels, retail parks and supermarkets. Our driving test centre managers are finding the most suitable car parks for each test centre.

      We're also talking to national car parking organisations to agree a joint approach to using car parks for this part of the test.

      Thanks
      John

  47. Comment by Kamran posted on

    Where can we obtain the preloaded route for the sat nav.

    • Replies to Kamran>

      Comment by John (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Kamran

      We don't publish driving test routes - and we won't be making the preloaded sat nav routes available.

      This is to make sure that the driving test reflects realistic driving conditions.

      Thanks
      John

  48. Comment by Paul SMITH posted on

    most car damage in a supermarket car park is caused by drivers driving into a parking bay and then not being able to manoeuvre out.
    Why not make them reverse park rather than forward park?

    • Replies to Paul SMITH>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      We decided to include forward parking in a bay because we wanted to include real-life scenarios. Many people in supermarket carparks drive forward into parking bays so it is easier to load shopping.

      Some candidates will have to reverse park in a bay on their test - it's one of two variants on the manoeuvre we've included in the test along with forward parking in a bay.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  49. Comment by Steve G Smith posted on

    Missed opportunity to reduce the number of faults allowed. It is still staggering that a student can make approx one fault every 3 minutes and still pass. This is allowing a ridiculously poor level of performance to driv e on the road legally. Faults permitted should be reduced to single figures!

  50. Comment by colin posted on

    Not sure about the TomTom Start 52
    are the DVSA aware that it can not find postcodes in rural areas?
    check out the reviews on amazon and tomtoms own forum
    not good to endorse something most adi's will buy and find it does not work for UK rural postcodes

  51. Comment by Lee Thomas posted on

    Thanks for an informative blog which highlights alot of positive points for the new test. I can see how this will be very useful for deaf drivers and make the test for the examiner alot easier to deliver. I do however find the mention of 20 minutes independant driving somewhat confusing.
    If the sat nav is giving full directions for the whole 20 minutes, how independant is it?
    Also, if 20% of candidates are following traffic signs like the current independant drive, is that not considerably more dificult?
    Years ago when independant driving was introduced, i could see a real benefit to candidates not being told every direction and having to plan following signs. I just can not see the difference between the examiner delivering the instruction, or the sat nav, therefore see this as an easier test to the current one. I'm also very interested to know how we will manage using the car parks for the forward park exercise as we are already having car parks fitting cameras in preparation. If it were just examiners using them, i wouldn't worry but instructors will be using the same car parks as us from 6am until 10pm, and with the best will in the world,people will tire of that. A sign in the waiting room will not stop the use of these car parks for practice.
    I have not been part of the initial trial so look forward to my training where i'm sure the points raised will be answered.

  52. Comment by Jeffrey Hammond posted on

    At present, I show my pupils a newspaper cutting entitled, "Sat Nav Sent Young Driver To Her Death Down Wrong Slip Road", should I stop doing this? I tell them NOT to use Sat Navs, but plan longer journeys using a Road Atlas, and read Signs Markings!

  53. Comment by Stu Walker posted on

    Thanks for this update. I assume that during the 'Show me' section "when it's safe to do so" also includes the option for the candidate to reduce risk of distraction by waiting until the vehicle is stationary.
    Also, the commands or requests aren't actually "questions" and this new test is a great opportunity to revise the way they are perceived. In creating a bank of "questions" these are generally perceived and taught as something to learn by rote before the test, when in reality they should be actions taken throughout the learn to drive course.
    Finally, 'Show me question 4 - why does it ask the candidate to show how to SET the rear demister? There are of course various settings for the front demister but only on/off options for the rear. Why doesn't it simply ask them to show me how to switch the rear demister on and off?

  54. Comment by Phil Ward posted on

    Parking on the is illegal in Australia and cars used to be towed away in Germany. If we really want to make the roads safer then why not make parking on the right facing oncoming traffic illegal. Speaking to the minister for transport would be helpful to make this happen.

  55. Comment by Michael Rawson posted on

    I believe that the changes are beneficial However, to reduce accidents more consideration must be given to restricting young drivers. I worked as a paramedic for twenty years and I've attended far too many RTC's, the majority of them - young people with little experience and an attitude of immature invincibility.
    1. Post test all drivers should display two P plates
    2.Restrict the engine size for at least two years to 1000
    3. Post test young drivers may only carry one passenger below the age of 25
    4. Insurance companies could do more to reward safe drivers. e.g.. Black Boxes, incentives for Pass Plus, Incentives for the IAM test.

  56. Comment by Mr Deonath Gosein posted on

    it will be interesting to see how these changes take place.I will have to go on every test to see how they are implemented.Can I make a suggestion to have an open day at specified Test Centres showing a Video on the New Changes and ask Questions at the End of the Video.It will be up to the Instructor to turn up.Many Thanks Have a Good Day Nath.A.D.I 05840.

  57. Comment by Tony posted on

    How will the new sat nav equipment be powered? Are they battery powered?
    My power socket is already used by security cameras which I do not wish to be unplugged. There is not room at my power outlet for a splitter to enable two plugs.
    Thank you

    • Replies to Tony>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      An external powerbank will be plugged into the sat nav itself for further power supply.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  58. Comment by colin phillips posted on

    My concern is with the stopping on the right. If, having reversed back the required distance, a large vehicle parks in front will the examiner be allowed to assist if the view ahead is restricted. If not, this could be very dangerous.

    • Replies to colin phillips>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      The examiner will give necessary guidance to assist the candidate when pulling away if their view is restricted by vehicles pulling close in front or behind during the time it takes to complete the manoeuvre.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  59. Comment by Phil Gunney posted on

    Whilst change can be good it's only good if it improves standards we will now have to teach against the recommendations of the Highway Code just because that's what's people do! Even though they shouldn't!!

    As for sat nav the recommended position of a sat nav is outside the area covered by the windscreen wipers putting it on a mat in the middle of the dashboard will reduce vision of road ahead especially on hill starts at junctions

  60. Comment by David posted on

    It is a shame we have put in the test the right hand stop as this is clearly a issue with road safety as it is a blind area even when looking around. In advanced driver training we are requesting all drivers reverse park so again it a shame we have not stood by what is safe. The Sat nav is good but we do need to be able to see the same type used to learn as will be on test.

  61. Comment by Russell Warner posted on

    In the 1 in 5 tests that are conducted following signs will this be 10 or 20 minutes and may it include an old style manoeuver ?

    • Replies to Russell Warner>

      Comment by John (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Russell

      The independent driving section will still last 20 minutes for those 1 in 5 tests where the candidate is asked to follow traffic signs. All car driving tests will only include the updated manoeuvres from 4 December 2017.

  62. Comment by lavinia Staddon posted on

    I am not happy about the driving forwards into a parking space. We are giving in to the masses instead of improving their driving. Kids espenally are harder to see.

  63. Comment by R. Allford posted on

    I presume the "show me" question whilst driving would be a slowing down hand signal, or turn left, or similar as I fail to see how they can show you something whilst driving!

  64. Comment by Lee Radford posted on

    I'm all for moving with the times, however if we're teaching Learner's to use modern car technology, then surely we should include things like reversing cameras, reversing sensors, Cruise control, push button parking brakes, etc.

  65. Comment by Tj posted on

    I like to say you guys did a great job .
    Point of changes on the driving test are spot on .
    1 issue is question asked well pupil driving asking to thing of an answer !
    Can we make sure this question ask not near to a junction and if pupil prefer to not to answer not to be repeated .
    It will coz pupil to drive safe.
    Thank you .

  66. Comment by Colin Lott posted on

    Firstly, I agree in principle that sat nav devices should be used on test and that the independent drive should be made longer, however...
    I find it ridiculous that, (A) Let's teach them to park forward and reverse out of a bay because "That's what they'll do when they pass their test anyway" Really? So then shall we also teach them how to safely drive at 40 mph in a 30 zone and drive one handed while smoking, well "that's what they'll do when they pass their test anyway" so why not teach it? Ridiculous ah?
    And (B) Let's just use private property (Local car parks) to conduct a private, paid for driving test. Have the owners of these car parks been consulted or does the DVSA just feel that it's absolutely fine to just fill local car parks with learners having to practice, without the permission of the land owners?

    • Replies to Colin Lott>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      In answer to your first point - we decided to include forward parking in a bay because we wanted to include real-life scenarios. Many people in supermarket carparks drive forward into parking bays so it is easier to load shopping.

      In answer to your second point - we're only going to use car parks with no restriction for use for forward parking in a bay during the test. For reverse parking in a bay, we will only use test centre car parks.

      We've also liaised with the British Parking Association (BPA) and other car park owners/operators and produced a guidance poster for all driving test centre waiting rooms. This will help you choose car parks to train your pupils in.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  67. Comment by Jane posted on

    Please can you create a PDF version of these questions so they can be easily downloaded and shared. Thank you.

  68. Comment by Kenn D Crossley posted on

    Parking on the right:
    Over the many years i have been driving, a large portion of which was high-mileage, i have seen many accidents, near misses and road rage caused by parking on the right. Personally i think this should have been outlawed a long time ago and, being a person to live by example, i have not done this since i was in my twenties. Yet you would now expect me to do this if i ever decided to re-sit my test?
    Satnav:
    The vast majority of older drivers don't use a satnav's. Most of them only drive, relatively local, regular routes, e.g. specific (favourite) shops; various clubs; relatives; etc, yet they are now forced to use an item they don't want, certainly don't need and will probably find quite confusing.
    I take it that these changes were designed to rid the road of older, significantly safer, drivers so that younger drivers will have more road space to allow them to drive even faster. Well done!

  69. Comment by COLIN HALFORD posted on

    Hello,interesting blog & agree the test needs to move forward to reflect modern driving today,however i do disagree with some of the changes & here are my concerns -:
    Bay parking has always been taught to reverse into as its more accurate( front wheels guide the back in) but also safer on pulling out again, to say that the change is to reflect what drivers now seem to do on a daily basis is like saying drivers nowadays often go 40-50mph in a 30mph zone but that's ok because everybody does it! Surly parking in a bay should be taught safety first,i recently had a 30yr old man ring me about driving lessons & he explained that he could already drive but had been banned for 3 years,i enquired about the cause of the ban & he answered with "I was reversing at very slow speed out of a bay & an old lady walked behind his car whilst he was looking left &right to check for traffic he bumped into her at extremely slow speed & knocked her down even the police said it was a freak accident unfortunately she banged her head & died 3 days later! A lot of parking lots in my area are putting up signs saying no learner drivers & speaking to an examiner just the other day had his concerns also.
    Sat nav for 20 minutes seems a bit too long although i do agree its the norm now & i think it will be a good tool to see how the pupil drives without being given directions from the examiner My concern is that pupils will be tempted to look at the sat nav & not at the road though maybe a shorter time as is the independent drive now?

  70. Comment by Sally Franklin posted on

    Will the turn in the road and reversing round a corner still be included in the test syllabus?

    • Replies to Sally Franklin>

      Comment by John (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Sally

      The ‘reverse around a corner’ and ‘turn-in-the-road’ manoeuvres will no longer be tested, but should still be taught. They continue to be part of the national standard for driving cars and the learning to drive syllabus.

      Thanks
      John

      • Replies to John (DVSA)>

        Comment by Angus McFadden posted on

        John, if they're not tested for, then the issue of them being "on the syllabus" becomes moot.

        By definition, a "syllabus" is a list of subjects to be taught, but you can only know if they HAVE been taught if there is a "test" to assess the acquired knowledge.

        If they're not going to be tested for, then they will end up not being taught at all. In some cases, they will specifically NOT be taught for any test occurring on or after 4 December 2017.

  71. Comment by Ramesh Versani posted on

    From all the information published, There is no explanation as to what will be the standard procedure if the test route encounters traffic during independent driving. Additionally none of the advice published indicates the density of traffic the candidate will be required to negotiate in order to park on the right side of the road.

    • Replies to Ramesh Versani>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      As is the current practice, if traffic is busy this will be managed by the examiner. In exceptional circumstances, the route will be adjusted without the integrity of the test being compromised.

      The road used will be a general main road that would be expected to carry light to moderate traffic. There isn't a requirement to have any other traffic around and, if it is too busy, the exercise will not be carried out at that time to prevent any unnecessary delays.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  72. Comment by Paul Cunningham posted on

    When driving forward into a bay would this be to the right or left?
    Would this be next to another vechicle or between two cars?

    • Replies to Paul Cunningham>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      Parking in a bay will be conducted in a car park where there are a variety of options for the candidate to select a suitable bay.

      The examiner will avoid car parks where only single bays are available. The candidate will then choose a bay either with or without vehicles on either side.

      The wording given by the instructor will depend on the layout of the car park - if bays are available on both sides then their instructions will reflect this. The examiner will adapt their instructions if bays are only available in one direction.

      I hope this answers your question.

      Chris

  73. Comment by Douglas Templeton posted on

    You suggest that we use "consideration" when practicing reversing in supermarket car parks and yet ALL the test centres in my area, West Lancs, Blackpool, Preston, Heysham etc zealously refuse access for practice in their car parks. Is it fair to use private car parks when we are refused time in your

    • Replies to Douglas Templeton>

      Comment by John (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Douglas

      We'll use a wide variety of car parks for the bay parking exercise, such hotels, retail parks and supermarkets. Our driving test centre managers are finding the most suitable car parks for each test centre.

      We're also talking to national car parking organisations to agree a joint approach to using car parks for this part of the test.

  74. Comment by Mike Gillin posted on

    The sat nav screen will be on throughout the test but won’t show directions until the independent driving part of the test, when the examiner will activate the pre-loaded section of the route. The sound will be used for the independent driving part of the test unless your pupil asks for it to be turned off

    The above is a quote from your latest despatch blog. My questions are:
    1. Is the sound on while the sat nav is on during the non independent part of the drive?
    2. If the pupil asks for the sound to be turned off for the independent drive part of the test (your words) how will they hear the directions or are they supposed to follow the sat nav screen only?

    • Replies to Mike Gillin>

      Comment by Olivia (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Mike,

      The sound won't be on during the rest of the test. If the pupil asks for the sound to be turned off during the independent drive, they'll use the directions on the sat nav screen as a visual aid.

  75. Comment by Graeme Rolfe posted on

    I am under the impression that it is illegal to pull up on the right-hand side of the road in a number of EU countries and so surprised that you are introducing it into the new format driving test!

  76. Comment by luigi Iennaco posted on

    Another change which was suggested was the introduction of motorway driving in a dual controlled car. I noticed that this new change has not taken place. As many young drivers will travel long way soon after passing their tests it would have been ideal to introduce this change at the same time. Will the DVSA introduce this additional facility in the near future???

    • Replies to luigi Iennaco>

      Comment by John (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Luigi

      The government has recently consulted on proposals to allow learner drivers to have driving lessons on motorways with a fully qualified driving instructor. The results are still being analysed, but any decisions will be published at https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/allowing-learner-drivers-to-have-driving-lessons-on-motorways

      While it's desirable that anyone using motorways should have received instruction in their correct use, it's not feasible to require this of all learner drivers.

      Some areas are simply too far from a motorway for this to be practical and not all learner drivers will wish to take a motorway lesson.

  77. Comment by Barry Mason posted on

    When the pupil is asked to park on the opposite side of the road in poor visibility, and vehicle lights are needed, our driver may temporarily be parking without lights ie. white lights facing oncoming traffic, especially headlights. Will this manoeuvre still be carried out in such poor conditions?

    • Replies to Barry Mason>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      Pulling up on the right is not a parking exercise. The candidate will be asked to pull over to the right to conduct a manoeuvre rather than parking. As this manoeuvre will be conducted on 1 in 4 tests (or 1 in 3 in DTCs without reverse park car parks) the examiner has the flexibility to choose when the manoeuvre is conducted depending on suitable circumstances at that time.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  78. Comment by ALLEN GREENHELD posted on

    great looking forward to these changes .

  79. Comment by Ivan Westley posted on

    As an instructor and a very experienced driver and learned how to read maps in the boy scouts. I feel Sat nav is a big step backwards. Most of my pupils get left and right mixed up . They would resort to visually checking sat nav which is as dangerous as a mobile phone in text mode.
    Secondly is DVSA supplying me with a Sat nav to train myself and my pupils?

    • Replies to Ivan Westley>

      Comment by John (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Ivan

      We want to ensure that new drivers have the best possible preparation for driving on their own after they have passed. Sat navs are now in common use and reflects real life driving situations. Using sat navs should also enable the introduction of better routes, over a greater distance, with more of the test taking place away from side roads.

      Increasing the independent driving section from 10 to 20 minutes will enable examiners to access higher risk roads, where statistically, new drivers have the most crashes. For example, high speed rural roads, which were often inaccessible due to the need of appropriate traffic signs for independent driving. Furthermore, using a sat nav during this section of the test will encourage a wider range of training, not only preparing new drivers to drive safely on rural roads, but also to manage distractions.

      DVSA will provide the sat nav for the test, but won't buy sat navs for ADIs for training. It doesn't matter which sat nav you use for practice. It could be a built-in sat nav, mobile phone or stand alone sat nav. It's up to ADIs to choose the product that will works for them and their pupils.

  80. Comment by Graham Carroll posted on

    I'm really struggling to find something positive to say about this blog, but it has a few mixed messages ie ' inadvisable but legal'??. It also suggests that current independent driving is carried out on quiet rds??. Try Middlesbrough 's A174, A19 and A66, as presently used on test, all fast busy dualcarraigeway 's. Pulling over on the right will be aborted if a car pulls up behind, why?? The reversing part is the safest and easiest part of that manoeuvre, it's the pulling in and driving out that's the issue. With regard to removing outdated manoeuvres, I've just returned from a driving holiday in France and carried out at least 2 turns in the road. As a passionate and enthusiastic ADI, I simply 'dont get it'

  81. Comment by Graham Taylor ADI posted on

    Will candidates be asked to pull up on the left, before moving across to the right hand side of the road to perform the manoeuvre, or will the instruction be given while the candidate is driving?

    • Replies to Graham Taylor ADI>

      Comment by John (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Graham

      The examiner will give the instruction to carry out the manoeuvre while the candidate is driving.

  82. Comment by Steve Chapman ADI posted on

    Can you arrange that at each test centre a Sample TomTom route is available for download to help instructors explain to each pupil what the Examiners TomTom will show???

    • Replies to Steve Chapman ADI>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      We won't be providing a sample sat nav as any device that gives audible directions and a visual active map can be used for training purposes. The Satnav will remain on throughout the test. Test routes are not published and sample routes are not available.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  83. Comment by john philp posted on

    i think that it is the way to go i still think that motorway driving should be part of the test and music when driving should also be part of the test as its the first think the a new driver dose as soon as they start to drive on there own

  84. Comment by nige3367 posted on

    If we are trying to make the roads safer we are essentially GIVING IN to people who do things unsafely... Lets not follow the safe things the highway code says because nobody takes any notice of it. Such as driving into a bay or parking on the right.. Just because lots of people do it doesn't make it the right thing to do or the safe thing to do...

  85. Comment by nige3367 posted on

    How is a SAT NAV giving you verbal Directions any different to an Examiner giving you verbal Directions ???
    Roads signs are far more of a challenge

  86. Comment by colin adi posted on

    Are the DVSA aware that the tomtom start 52 asks people to drive across a roundabout. How will this be marked when person on the tests, follows the instructions of the sat nav and drives across a roundabout.
    for left turns is says go around roundabout. for right turns is says go around roundabout, but for ahead it says cross roundabout 2nd exit

  87. Comment by John Lewis posted on

    Many instructors have voiced concerns be it good or incorrect advice, but the reality is, the people who are authorising these alterations to the driving test, must also be prepared to accept the increase in driver deaths, including the unfortunate driver who was acting within the rules of the Highway Code.

  88. Comment by Gavin J Caldicott posted on

    I would really love to voice all my concerns and real fears regarding the changes that will take place within the driving test from the 4th of December, however, I genuinely believe no one in authority will read them, analyse them, value their worth and certainly not act on them! Cynicism, or fact?
    Either way, 'it' will hit the fan on the 4th!
    I must say, many of the points I have read, from my Instructor-colleagues, are well founded and I concur with many of them.

    • Replies to Gavin J Caldicott>

      Comment by John (DVSA) posted on

      Hi Gavin

      We routinely review the content of the driving test. We want to ensure that it reflects real life driving so that new drivers are prepared as best as possible for driving on their own.

      We worked with the driver training industry and other interested bodies to identify these beneficial changes that reflect common driver behaviour.

      We're making the changes following a:

      - public consultation that over 3,900 people took part in
      - trial of the changes involving over 4,300 learner drivers and over 860 driving instructors

      The proposals were widely supported by those who responded to the consultation. The results of the consultation show that:

      - 88.2% agreed with increasing the length of the independent driving part of the test
      - 70.8% agreed with asking candidates to follow directions from a sat nav
      - 78.6% agreed with the plans to change how the reversing manoeuvres are tested
      - 78.4% agreed with asking the ‘show me’ question while the candidate is driving

      Just as there were lots of questions and concerns when we originally introduced the independent driving part of the test in 2010, we know there'll be questions and concerns about these changes.

      Our published response to the consultation addresses concerns that were raised by people who responded to the consultation. You can read that here: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/improving-the-car-driving-test

      Please do leave your questions here so we can get back to you with any information that you need to help you prepare for the changes.

      The elements of the test, including the increase of independent driving from 10 to 20 minutes, has been designed to transfer more responsibility to the candidate, making them better equipped to drive alone and think for themselves on the road.

      The current practical driving test spends a disproportionate time on low-risk roads, such as housing estates, largely to access locations to carry out manoeuvring exercises. The updated manoeuvres, whilse testing the same skill set, are more representative of what a new driver will encounter in their everyday driving.

      While conducting the test on a variety of different roads, the changes to the test will allow the examiner to access higher risk roads, where statistically new drivers have the most crashes.

      Using a sat nav during this section of the test will encourage a wider range of training, not only preparing new drivers to drive safely on rural roads, but also to manage distractions.

      Thanks
      John

  89. Comment by Nick evans posted on

    How about some replies to the various issues raised on this blog dvsa

  90. Comment by Roger Hosking ADI posted on

    Dear DVSA.

    I have to say that I am not in favour of your 'Improvements' to the driving test. Like other comments above, changing the way new drivers are examined with manoeuvres are that are potential quite dangerous, just because that's the way other drivers do it, is no reason to change the test. Drivers where I work (Chichester) completely ignore mini roundabouts, so do you want us ADI's to teach that as well?
    I think you have forgotten what the name of your department is. It's the Driving and Vehicle STANDARDS Agency.
    Instead of spending money on a new test, perhaps you could run some advertising campaings to educate qualified drivers on the correct use of indicators as this seems to be another one of those actions that many driviers don't do, and would certainly make a far bigger contribution to road safety and driving standards, than trying to reverse out of a parking bay and trying to move off from the wrong side of the road.
    I heard this from another Instructor a few weeks ago. Make the test an hour long, and drop the fail mark down to either 12 or 10 minors.

  91. Comment by Roger Hosking ADI posted on

    Hello again.

    If the Health and Safety Executive were responsible for road safety, would they recomend driving into a parking bay? Or parking facing on-coming traffic?

  92. Comment by John Clark posted on

    What statistics will the DVSA be collecting to demonstrate one way or another whether or not there is a statistically significant difference in the results obtained by those candidates asked to perform independent driving by following road signs and those asked to perform independent driving using a SatNav, and where and when will those statistics be published?

  93. Comment by David Dansky posted on

    Both National and Local government now see cycling as a solution to many current issues including improving the environment by reducing pollution and congestion, as well as improving people’s health. Key to encouraging more cycling is ensuring that cyclists are welcome and equal road users. Key to this is how car drivers interact with people riding cycles.

    It is a shame that the changes did not include a suggestion from many cycling groups that new drivers are tested interacting with cyclists where they are present in the environment. Observing a driver decide whether or not to overtake the cyclist(s), choosing to remain behind the cyclists(s) if overtaking would be unnecessary, illegal or risky. Should the driver decide to overtake we would expect them to give the rider at least as much space as they would if overtaking a car, and to pass at a speed only slightly faster than that of the rider.

    Should the driver encounter a cyclists at a place where there is a chance that they may need to swerve to the right, such as when passing parked cars where a door may open or a pedestrian step out between the parked cars, the driver should be observed deciding not to overtake or demonstrate overtaking taking into account the possibility that a rider may swerve right. Similarly when moving through a location where the road narrows, a driver should be observed remaining behind the cyclist. The experience of dangerous and close overtaking will put some people off cycling.

    Young riders, through the government Bikeability scheme are taught to ride away from parked cars and away from the kerb, to ride in positions where they are more visible to drivers. In many cases they will be safer riding centrally in a lane. Had this driving test revision included the elements above that would likely help drivers appreciate how people ride cycles and perhaps minimise some drivers frustration about cyclists being 'in their way'

  94. Comment by Reece Nixon posted on

    Hello, I'm 17 and currently learning to drive. I'll probably only have 1 or 2 attempts at the current 'old' driving test before it changes in December. Does this mean I will have to re-learn how to do the driving test, as I will have to be taught these new skills and forget about the old ones? Or am I expected to learn both driving tests simultaneously? This seems unfair to pupils sitting their driving tests just before they change.

    • Replies to Reece Nixon>

      Comment by Angus McFadden posted on

      Reece, I'm surprised no one has replied to you on this.

      First of all, December is a long way off, and you shouldn't be thinking in terms of just "having a go". There is no reason why you shouldn't pass first time if you've been trained properly. Just be positive about it and you will be fine. I don't know how many lessons you have had, or what you are like as a driver, but if you're having one or two hours a week you may easily be ready well before December.

      If it turns out that you ARE taking the new test at some point then again you shouldn't worry. Your instructor should teach you what is necessary, and in theory that will just mean two new "manoeuvres" - neither of which comes even close to reversing around a corner in terms of complexity - and following directions from a satnav instead of the examiner. Two of the manoeuvres you already know will disappear from the test.

      In all honesty, if you hadn't seen this story then you'd would hardly have realised anything was changing unless your instructor was making a song and dance over it to you. The main concerns are for instructors.

      You haven't got to "unlearn" anything. DVSA says that instructors should teach everything exactly as before (including the manoeuvres which will no longer be tested) and then tack the new bits on. The reality is likely to be that many instructors will quickly start teaching only the new manoeuvres - so you'll actually be a better driver than those who learn in future who will likely not be shown the old manoeuvres at all.

    • Replies to Reece Nixon>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      The syllabus for learning to drive is not changing and, as a learner driver, you should not be taught how to pass a driving test, but how to drive safely and competently to ensure a lifetime of safe driving.

      The skills that you are taught will be assessed on the new test as well as the current test but, as all driving tests will be the new style after the 4th December, then it is essential that you are prepared.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  95. Comment by Ian Larkin posted on

    If parking forwards into a bay is selected by the examiner, will the candidate be directed to a car park and told to drive forwards into any bay they like, or will they be directed around the car park and told to drive forwards into a specific bay? If so will they be asked to park between two cars or will it be a bay that is clear on both sides? Also if parking on the right is selected, will the candidate be told where to park on the right and reverse for 2 car lengths, or will they be told to "pull up at a convenient spot on the right"?

    • Replies to Ian Larkin>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      Parking in a bay will be conducted in a car park where there are a variety of options for the candidate to select a suitable bay.

      The examiner will avoid car parks where only single bays are available. The candidate will then choose a bay either with or without vehicles on either side.

      The wording given by the instructor will depend on the layout of the car park - if bays are available on both sides then their instructions will reflect this. The examiner will adapt their instructions if bays are only available in one direction.

      With the pull up on the right, the candidate will be asked to pull up on the right when it is safe rather than at a safe place. This is a manoeuvre rather than a normal stop exercise and the location that is chosen by the examiner will allow ample opportunity for the candidate to select when they think it is safe to move across to the right. If it becomes apparent that the opportunity to pull up somewhere suitable no longer exists then the examiner will control this situation with the possibility of aborting the exercise and choosing another location later in the test.

      Thanks,

      Chris

      • Replies to Chris (DVSA)>

        Comment by Ian Larkin posted on

        Thanks for that Chris. It all seems perfectly fine to me and does seem to reflect realistic driving in today's times.

  96. Comment by Colin J Brookes BA posted on

    As a retired Driving Examiner I am appalled by some of the nonsense put forward by the DVLA , the driving test in my day was quite fair and worthwhile, especially as it was a test to assess the drivers suitability to drive safely, and above all then to gain experience and learn to drive and improve. We had plenty of dual carriageways for candidates to drive at speed which was the same for motorways and above all was FAIR. Yes, advanced driving skills including IAM still mean that I am still learning. Much of what I have read here will not help but hinder matters.

  97. Comment by Trevor Smith posted on

    How interesting to read the comments of many cynical driving instructors who seem to reject any changes from the good old days when they learnt to drive. I think the DVSA should be applauded in trying to make the test more relevant to todays driving environment. I don't own a sat nav but have used them. I think it would be useful if it was emphasised that sat navs are designed to give directions, and any other information they give, for instance the speed limit should be regarded with some cynicism as they are not always correct. Also that some of the directions they give can be confusing, one only has to look at the ever increasing numbers of drivers who drive the wrong way up a motorway because they believe that is what the sat nav told them.

    On another note are there any demonstrations of the new test being conducted online. I am a licenced driving instructor until 2020, however I am not currently conducting driving lessons for new drivers. If I were to decide to return to teaching new drivers I would like to see something which would allow me to update myself on the new test and tailor my teaching practices to reflect these changes.

  98. Comment by charles Owens posted on

    It does not matter how the DVSA tries to explain or promote the new driving test, if the overall concept is viewed to be negative by so many people. The statement "Making The Driving Test More Reflective Of Real Life Driving" is very commendable. However such a bold statement should not be seen to include or to be encouraging what could be viewed as a RISK or DANGEROUS situation. I feel it to be quite in order to suggest that regarding any proposed changes that safety should be paramount. Over the decades the DVSA have forced through changes . These changes are not progress, in fact I think that it is a giant step backwards. It is already generating despair with both ADI/s and examiners.

    The New Test
    1---Extending the independent drive----Good idea.
    2---Introducing Sat Nav---Totally unnecessary, They should not need a gadget to drive.
    3---Bay Parking out on the road---Big problems in finding a car park where you would not be asked to leave.
    4---The right reverse--- Totally unnecessary, both Risky and could be very Dangerous. Expect to see car insurances increase substantially.

    I have always promoted good sensible safe driving to send learner forward. I feel that this New Test is encouraging trainers to deviate away from such good standards?

  99. Comment by Kalps posted on

    As many agree, it's the attitude of experienced drivers -like tailgating, pulling in front abruptly etc- are putting many ppl in danger. I see many experienced drivers not even indicating at the round abouts. These experienced drivers need to take driving practical tests once in a while to see if they really have standards to drive. It's unfair to expect a learner / newly passed driver to stand up to real world situations while it's experienced drivers who are responsible for bad situations on roads. How can dvsa expect learners to drive with same confidence as of 15yrs experienced? This is nuts and completely unreal. They should strive to make situation better on roads by improving older drivers' attitudes but not the other way round. The main reason for current road situations is experienced drivers attitude. Dvsa should try to eradicate the real problem and root cause for bad road situations. Current dvsa test standards only lead to much worse roads.

  100. Comment by Tina ADI posted on

    Hi, I have a pupil who is on the Autism Spectrum. She cannot cope with a sat nav even though we've tried a few times. She gets very agitated by it and swears she will never use one. Will she be allowed to ask to not use it on her test or will there be no choice?

    • Replies to Tina ADI>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      The satnav will be used on 4 out of 5 tests, with the remaining 1 out of 5 following traffic signs.

      The examiner will do all they can to ensure the candidate is not disadvantaged during their test and will control it accordingly.

      I would suggest that you visit the local driving test manager well before the test date and discuss specific requirements with them so reasonable adjustments can be made if necessary.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  101. Comment by Raymond Bryant posted on

    Satellite navigation systems have been blamed for causing around 300,000 people to crash in Britain, a survey has found.
    A further 1.5 million drivers admitted performing sudden manoeuvres or changing direction because they were following the devices' directions, while five million said they had driven the wrong way down a one-way street.
    One in five of the 2,000 motorists polled blamed the gadget for making them hesitate on a busy road and lose track of the traffic, while more than one in 50 said it had caused or nearly caused an accident.
    This was a poll carried out by the DAILY TELEGRAPH NEWSPAPER.

    The British Parking Association Limited (BPA) are a trade organisation for parking companies in the UK. The BPA Ltd is not a Governmental organisation; it is paid for and run by its members for their benefit. So it 's no good liasing with then over parking in car parks.So where can I get a list of usable car parks in the Hornchurch area to practice bay parking.If you have made these arrangements with then or local authorities or carpark owners you must have copies of them to send me.After all you said they where going to be posted in test centres.I cannot wait for copies of these E-mail me them at your convienience.Thank you

    • Replies to Raymond Bryant>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      In answer to your question about car parks - we cannot produce a list of suitable car parks within certain areas, as the intention on the driving test is to use a variety of car parks over a wide area of test routes.

      As driving instructors will invariably spend more time in the car park due to having to teach the manoeuvres, we would urge them to not overuse the same car parks and not necessarily use the same ones as on the driving test, as this may cause disruption to customers and car park operators/owners.

      The notices that will be provided in driving test centre waiting rooms is to offer similar guidance.

      Thanks,

      Chris

  102. Comment by ADI John posted on

    For the "pulling up on the right" manoeuvre, it isn't clear how close to the kerb they will be expected to be. Will this be clarified when the DT1 document is updated, and when is such update likely to be published?

    • Replies to ADI John>

      Comment by Chris (DVSA) posted on

      Hello,

      As this is a manoeuvre, the candidate will be expected to pull up and keep reasonably close to the kerb.

      Thanks,

      Chris